May 7th, 2012
Waldorf-Astoria Hotel Installs Bee Hives On Roof
via huffingtonpost.com 
NEW YORK — New York City’s Waldorf-Astoria Hotel is buzzing with thousands of tiny new visitors. The luxury hotel has installed six beehives on its rooftop with the goal of harvesting honey by mid-summer. One mature hive has 20,000 bees and five starter hives have 5,000 bees each. By August, the hotel hopes to host 300,000 bees in total. The bees arrived last week in a luxury car. Then they were escorted through the lobby to their new home on the 20th floor. Guests at the historic hotel can tour the hives. The insects also are visible from certain rooms. Honey will be used in dishes served at the hotel’s restaurant. Members of the public can help the hotel name the hives in a social media contest. 
[click here to read another article about the Waldorf-Astoria bees here]

Waldorf-Astoria Hotel Installs Bee Hives On Roof

via huffingtonpost.com
 

NEW YORK — New York City’s Waldorf-Astoria Hotel is buzzing with thousands of tiny new visitors.

The luxury hotel has installed six beehives on its rooftop with the goal of harvesting honey by mid-summer. One mature hive has 20,000 bees and five starter hives have 5,000 bees each.

By August, the hotel hopes to host 300,000 bees in total.

The bees arrived last week in a luxury car. Then they were escorted through the lobby to their new home on the 20th floor.

Guests at the historic hotel can tour the hives. The insects also are visible from certain rooms.

Honey will be used in dishes served at the hotel’s restaurant.

Members of the public can help the hotel name the hives in a social media contest.
 

[click here to read another article about the Waldorf-Astoria bees here]

April 17th, 2012

VIDEO: Urban Beekeeping: NYC
"Every new beekeeper is an asset to the community…it’s always a good thing"

September 28th, 2011
Huffington Post Article:
Kosher Honey: Making It a Sweet Rosh Hashanah With Bees

"At no time during my experience in a New York City rabbinical school  did I think I would ever be donning full beekeeper regalia and watching  as thousands of bees made honey on a farm in Michigan’s Amish country.  But that is precisely what I found myself doing for the first time this  past spring.
In addition to learning about the honey-making process, I’ve also  learned about colony collapse disorder, the unexplained phenomenon of  worker bees disappearing from hives causing a shortage of bee honey in  recent years. I learned this from Don and Carol Ragan, a lovely couple  who own the Windmill Hill Farm in Croswell (located in the “thumb” of  Michigan). Carol first contacted me in February immediately after  reading an article in the Detroit Free Press about Kosher Michigan, the kosher certification agency I started. She wanted to know what was involved in obtaining certification for her bee honey.
I told her that I would have to get back to her because I really  wasn’t sure what it took to certify bee honey as kosher. The mere fact  that bee honey is kosher is itself odd. After all, it is a product of  the non-kosher bee (no insects except for certain locust species are  deemed kosher by the Torah). So, how can a product of a non-kosher  animal be kosher? It is believed that honey is kosher since it is  produced outside of the body of the bee. But that isn’t totally true. In  actuality, bees suck nectar from flowers with their proboscis (mouth)  and this nectar mixes with saliva and is swallowed into the honey sac,  where enzymes from the saliva break down the nectar into honey. The  nectar is never digested, but rather transformed into honey by the  saliva.  The honey is regurgitated when the bee returns to the hive and  the water is evaporated, thereby thickening it into honey which is then  sealed in the honeycomb. The rabbis of the Talmud explain that bee honey  is kosher since it is not an actual secretion of the bee, but rather  the bee functions as a carrier and facilitator of the honey-making  process.
All of this is interesting because honey is a staple food of the  Jewish New Year’s holiday of Rosh Hashanah, which begins this year on  Wednesday, Sept. 28… Among the familiar  traditions of Rosh Hashanah are the dipping of apple slices in honey and  eating honey cake…
"We’re passionate about making honey," said Carol Ragan. "When we  first discovered hives on our Croswell farm we were excited to  experiment with making honey. We never realized how much we would come  to enjoy it or how much of a market there is for honey products."
Even with colony collapse disorder, beekeeping is on the rise  throughout the country. New York City legalized recreational beekeeping  last year, and even Michelle Obama had a beehive installed outside the  White House.
…While the Bible describes Israel as “the land flowing with milk and  honey,” it was more than likely referring to date honey. Bees were not  common in Israel thousands of years ago, but today Israel has about 500  beekeepers with approximately 90,000 beehives that produce more than  3,500 tons of honey annually.
The basis of using honey in baked goods and dipping apples into honey  on Rosh Hashanah is to have a sweet year. While the secular New Year is  kicked off with toasts of champagne, the Jewish New Year is launched  with the sweet taste of honey. And maybe a little sugar high too.”
[Click here to read the full article on HuffingtonPost.com]

Huffington Post Article:

Kosher Honey: Making It a Sweet Rosh Hashanah With Bees


"At no time during my experience in a New York City rabbinical school did I think I would ever be donning full beekeeper regalia and watching as thousands of bees made honey on a farm in Michigan’s Amish country. But that is precisely what I found myself doing for the first time this past spring.

In addition to learning about the honey-making process, I’ve also learned about colony collapse disorder, the unexplained phenomenon of worker bees disappearing from hives causing a shortage of bee honey in recent years. I learned this from Don and Carol Ragan, a lovely couple who own the Windmill Hill Farm in Croswell (located in the “thumb” of Michigan). Carol first contacted me in February immediately after reading an article in the Detroit Free Press about Kosher Michigan, the kosher certification agency I started. She wanted to know what was involved in obtaining certification for her bee honey.

I told her that I would have to get back to her because I really wasn’t sure what it took to certify bee honey as kosher. The mere fact that bee honey is kosher is itself odd. After all, it is a product of the non-kosher bee (no insects except for certain locust species are deemed kosher by the Torah). So, how can a product of a non-kosher animal be kosher? It is believed that honey is kosher since it is produced outside of the body of the bee. But that isn’t totally true. In actuality, bees suck nectar from flowers with their proboscis (mouth) and this nectar mixes with saliva and is swallowed into the honey sac, where enzymes from the saliva break down the nectar into honey. The nectar is never digested, but rather transformed into honey by the saliva. The honey is regurgitated when the bee returns to the hive and the water is evaporated, thereby thickening it into honey which is then sealed in the honeycomb. The rabbis of the Talmud explain that bee honey is kosher since it is not an actual secretion of the bee, but rather the bee functions as a carrier and facilitator of the honey-making process.

All of this is interesting because honey is a staple food of the Jewish New Year’s holiday of Rosh Hashanah, which begins this year on Wednesday, Sept. 28… Among the familiar traditions of Rosh Hashanah are the dipping of apple slices in honey and eating honey cake…

"We’re passionate about making honey," said Carol Ragan. "When we first discovered hives on our Croswell farm we were excited to experiment with making honey. We never realized how much we would come to enjoy it or how much of a market there is for honey products."

Even with colony collapse disorder, beekeeping is on the rise throughout the country. New York City legalized recreational beekeeping last year, and even Michelle Obama had a beehive installed outside the White House.

…While the Bible describes Israel as “the land flowing with milk and honey,” it was more than likely referring to date honey. Bees were not common in Israel thousands of years ago, but today Israel has about 500 beekeepers with approximately 90,000 beehives that produce more than 3,500 tons of honey annually.

The basis of using honey in baked goods and dipping apples into honey on Rosh Hashanah is to have a sweet year. While the secular New Year is kicked off with toasts of champagne, the Jewish New Year is launched with the sweet taste of honey. And maybe a little sugar high too.”

[Click here to read the full article on HuffingtonPost.com]

September 23rd, 2011

Brooklyn's Urban Beekeepers: Breaking The Law For The Planet (Part I) from SkeeterNYC on Vimeo.

VIDEO: Brooklyn’s Urban Beekeepers: Breaking The Law For The Planet

HELP US TO LEGALIZE URBAN BEEKEEPING IN LOS ANGELES!!!
Link to our petition: http://www.change.org/petitions/help-legalize-beekeeping-in-mar-vista

July 16th, 2011

 

Un-BEE-lievable: NYC Fines Man $2,000 For Not Watering His Hive

Click here to read the article on cbslocal.com

May 30th, 2011
Just finished making our first batch of HoneyLove California Orange Poppy Seed Packets! JOIN US - JUNE 14TH !!!We are presenting an "Urban Beekeeping Pilot Project" to the Mar Vista City Council in the hopes of beginning the process of legalizing beekeeping in Los Angeles - COME OUT AND SHOW YOUR SUPPORT FOR HONEY BEES!! 

Tuesday, June 14 · 7:00pm - 9:00pmMar Vista Recreation Center Auditorium11430 Woodbine Street, Mar Vista CA 90066
New York, Seattle, San Francisco… and most recently SANTA MONICA have legalized beekeeping…. Now we NEED YOUR HELP to get Los Angeles up to speed!
If you can’t make it - you can also email Bill Rosendahl to show your support!bill.rosendhal [at] lacity [dot] org
Check out the list of Los Angeles Urban Beekeeping supporters so far!

Just finished making our first batch of HoneyLove California Orange Poppy Seed Packets! 

JOIN US - JUNE 14TH !!!
We are presenting an "Urban Beekeeping Pilot Project" to the Mar Vista City Council in the hopes of beginning the process of legalizing beekeeping in Los Angeles - COME OUT AND SHOW YOUR SUPPORT FOR HONEY BEES!! 

Tuesday, June 14 · 7:00pm - 9:00pm
Mar Vista Recreation Center Auditorium
11430 Woodbine Street, Mar Vista CA 90066

New York, Seattle, San Francisco… and most recently SANTA MONICA have legalized beekeeping…. 
Now we NEED YOUR HELP to get Los Angeles up to speed!

If you can’t make it - you can also email Bill Rosendahl to show your support!
bill.rosendhal [at] lacity [dot] org

Check out the list of Los Angeles Urban Beekeeping supporters so far!

How to Keep Bees in New York City

by Sami Grover, Carrboro

When we spoke to the directors of the Vanishing of the Bees documentary as part of Discovery’s Bees on the Brink efforts, they talked about their delight that cities around the world were recognizing the value of bees in the urban environment. In fact, they told us, bees are often doing better in inner city environments than they are in the countryside where monoculture fields of single crops have become all too commonplace. Nowhere is the renaissance of urban beekeeping more noticeable than in New York City, which only recently lifted its ban on city bees. The video [above] gives a glimpse into the life of an urban rooftop beekeeper in New York City.

Click here to view the full article

May 29th, 2011

WHO: Post Office Films 
WHAT: Bee City 
WHERE: New York City