July 12th, 2012
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WATCH: Calif. Man Finds 50,000 Bees Inside Home
via ABC News: Top Stories!!

Thanks MikeBee for the awesome buzz about HoneyLove.org!!


Audree Steinberg reports:

On July 7 a photojournalist discovered an estimated 50,000 bees living in the walls of his Los Angeles home, and he wasn’t even scared.

Spending little time at home because of work, Larry Chen, 27, initially didn’t notice the bees. According to the beekeeper he hired, the hive was an estimated six to eight months old.

A month ago, Chen began noticing bees buzzing in and out of his window, and he decided to investigate. According to Chen, the bees only came out during a 30-minute window in the day.

"I’m not really terrified of the bees… I just remained calm, and I figured they wouldn’t bother me too much… I got stung once, but I was more curious about how big the hive actually was. I figured it was just a small clump of 1,000 or so," Chen said.

After his investigation, he spent a month on the road, traveling for work. When he returned, Chen found time to call a professional to assess the situation. He explained that he recently saw a documentary about the endangerment of bees, so he wanted to save - not exterminate - them.

He found a man on Craigslist, who goes by the name Mike Bee, who said he would safely remove the bees. He is a member of the rescue organization Backwards Beekeepers, a group that works with HoneyLove.org in order to educate the public about bees.

"My policy is to relocate, not exterminate," the beekeeper explained.

It took Mike Bee and his wife five hours to remove the bees from the wall. Mike Bee was stung four times.

The bees entered through a ventilation pipe that airs out the attic and an area near a window, according to Mike Bee. Although the pipes were lined with a wire mesh, the squares were big enough for bees to fit through. Since the area was a dark, protective shelter and featured a convenient entry point, the space was very accommodating to a beehive.

First, the beekeeper located the bees and cut the drywall. Then he burned pine needles, creating a smoke that would calm the bees. Afterwards, he began vacuuming the bees in a custom-made device, so that the comb could be visible. He removed the queen and cut out the comb, placing it in a box with the bees.

After removing the bees, he scraped off any remnants of wax from the honeycombs and cleaned the area of the hive. He then stapled screening mesh over the ventilated pipes in order to deter a new swarm from finding the same spot.

The bees filled two boxes that fit 20,000 bees each, but there were still many strays. The beekeeper explained that the bees would be returned to the city after he completes a process called an orientation flight.

"It’s good we caught it at this time because it could have been a lot bigger," Chen said.

[click here to view the original story by ABC News]

June 16th, 2012
June 4th, 2012

Photos from this weekend  

May 24th, 2012
Mason Beehives [via meetyouat]
VIDEO: How to build a Mason bee homehttp://youtu.be/qvD9oIk9fpA

Mason Beehives [via meetyouat]

VIDEO: How to build a Mason bee home
http://youtu.be/qvD9oIk9fpA

(Source: charrsdoodlery)

May 21st, 2012
HONEYLOVE <3
[photo via Angela Giorg]

HONEYLOVE <3

[photo via Angela Giorg]

May 18th, 2012

"Damien, a beekeeper near Maribor converted two buses into bee houses. Actually, this is a common Slovenian practice, one that sets their beekeepers apart from others. He uses the bee buses for tourism and honey production. You can see the chalk marks on each hive that tell him the status of the hive. He says many tourists (many Japanese) will meditate in his bee bus. He opens all the hives and people can sit inside the bus surrounded by the noise of the buzzing bees.

While I was interviewing Damien, a few other neighbor beekeepers arrived with news that their own hives were dying off that day. Damien was nervous that something also might happen to his hives. In the past few years colony collapse, and other forms of hive disturbance have been affecting Slovenian bees.”

http://media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m44zc93JzP1r1glan.jpg

http://media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m44zd5e2gc1r1glan.jpg

http://media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m44zew1az51r1glan.jpg

http://media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m44zhgPvOG1r1glan.jpg

http://media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m44zfuhiF81r1glan.jpg

[via iamslovene]

May 7th, 2012
Waldorf-Astoria Hotel Installs Bee Hives On Roof
via huffingtonpost.com 
NEW YORK &#8212; New York City&#8217;s Waldorf-Astoria Hotel is buzzing with thousands of tiny new visitors. The luxury hotel has installed six beehives on its rooftop with the goal of harvesting honey by mid-summer. One mature hive has 20,000 bees and five starter hives have 5,000 bees each. By August, the hotel hopes to host 300,000 bees in total. The bees arrived last week in a luxury car. Then they were escorted through the lobby to their new home on the 20th floor. Guests at the historic hotel can tour the hives. The insects also are visible from certain rooms. Honey will be used in dishes served at the hotel&#8217;s restaurant. Members of the public can help the hotel name the hives in a social media contest. 
[click here to read another article about the Waldorf-Astoria bees here]

Waldorf-Astoria Hotel Installs Bee Hives On Roof

via huffingtonpost.com
 

NEW YORK — New York City’s Waldorf-Astoria Hotel is buzzing with thousands of tiny new visitors.

The luxury hotel has installed six beehives on its rooftop with the goal of harvesting honey by mid-summer. One mature hive has 20,000 bees and five starter hives have 5,000 bees each.

By August, the hotel hopes to host 300,000 bees in total.

The bees arrived last week in a luxury car. Then they were escorted through the lobby to their new home on the 20th floor.

Guests at the historic hotel can tour the hives. The insects also are visible from certain rooms.

Honey will be used in dishes served at the hotel’s restaurant.

Members of the public can help the hotel name the hives in a social media contest.
 

[click here to read another article about the Waldorf-Astoria bees here]

May 2nd, 2012
“The honey bee is a vital pollinator of important New Jersey crops, such as blueberries, apples, cranberries, cucumbers, squash and pumpkins&#8230; Having beehives in an urban setting, such as on the roof of the Hyatt, enhances backyard gardens in the surrounding area and provides honey that can possibly help neighboring allergy sufferers.”-New Jersey Secretary of Agriculture Douglas H. Fisher
 
Click here to read more about the Hyatt&#8217;s bees!!

“The honey bee is a vital pollinator of important New Jersey crops, such as blueberries, apples, cranberries, cucumbers, squash and pumpkins… Having beehives in an urban setting, such as on the roof of the Hyatt, enhances backyard gardens in the surrounding area and provides honey that can possibly help neighboring allergy sufferers.”-New Jersey Secretary of Agriculture Douglas H. Fisher

http://media.nj.com/star-ledger/photo/2012/04/10925350-standard.jpg http://media.nj.com/star-ledger/photo/2012/04/10925346-standard.jpg

Click here to read more about the Hyatt’s bees!!