January 9th, 2012
"Bee Orchid" -
The Bee Orchid (Ophrys apifera) is an herbaceous perennial plant belonging to the family… The name “Ophrys” derives from the Greek word “ophrys”, meaning  “eyebrow”, while the Latin name of the species “apifera” refers to the  bee-shaped lip… The Bee Orchid is the County flower of Bedfordshire, England.
[click here to learn more on wikipedia.org]

"Bee Orchid" -

The Bee Orchid (Ophrys apifera) is an herbaceous perennial plant belonging to the family… The name “Ophrys” derives from the Greek word “ophrys”, meaning “eyebrow”, while the Latin name of the species “apifera” refers to the bee-shaped lip… The Bee Orchid is the County flower of Bedfordshire, England.

[click here to learn more on wikipedia.org]

ARTICLE: Honeybees as plant ‘bodyguards’ -
"Honeybees are important to plants for reasons that go beyond pollination, according to a new study published in the December 23rd issue of Current Biology, a Cell Press publication. The insects’ buzz also defends plants against the caterpillars that would otherwise munch on them undisturbed.
The researchers, led by Jürgen Tautz of Biozentrum Universität  Würzburg, Germany, earlier found that many caterpillars possess fine  sensory hairs on the front portions of their bodies that enable them to  detect air vibrations, such as the sound of an approaching predatory  wasp or honeybee.
"These sensory hairs are not fine-tuned," Tautz said. "Therefore,  caterpillars cannot distinguish between hunting wasps and harmless  bees." If an "unidentified flying object" approaches, generating air  vibrations in the proper range, caterpillars stop moving or drop from  the plant…
"Our findings indicate for the first time that visiting honeybees  provide plants with a totally unexpected advantage," the researchers  said. "They not only transport pollen from flower to flower, but in  addition also reduce plant destruction by herbivores."
…If crops are combined with attractive flowers in such a way that  honeybees from nearby beehives constantly buzz around them, it may lead  to significantly higher yields in areas with lots of leaf-eating pests—a  notion Tautz’s team intends to test. “Our finding may be the start of a  totally new biological control method,” he said.”
[click here to read the full post on physorg.com]

ARTICLE: Honeybees as plant ‘bodyguards’ -

"Honeybees are important to plants for reasons that go beyond pollination, according to a new study published in the December 23rd issue of Current Biology, a Cell Press publication. The insects’ buzz also defends plants against the caterpillars that would otherwise munch on them undisturbed.

The researchers, led by Jürgen Tautz of Biozentrum Universität Würzburg, Germany, earlier found that many caterpillars possess fine sensory hairs on the front portions of their bodies that enable them to detect air vibrations, such as the sound of an approaching predatory wasp or honeybee.

"These sensory hairs are not fine-tuned," Tautz said. "Therefore, caterpillars cannot distinguish between hunting wasps and harmless bees." If an "unidentified flying object" approaches, generating air vibrations in the proper range, caterpillars stop moving or drop from the plant…

"Our findings indicate for the first time that visiting honeybees provide plants with a totally unexpected advantage," the researchers said. "They not only transport pollen from flower to flower, but in addition also reduce plant destruction by herbivores."

…If crops are combined with attractive flowers in such a way that honeybees from nearby beehives constantly buzz around them, it may lead to significantly higher yields in areas with lots of leaf-eating pests—a notion Tautz’s team intends to test. “Our finding may be the start of a totally new biological control method,” he said.”

[click here to read the full post on physorg.com]

January 1st, 2012
Our first project in 2012 - We organized HoneyLove’s Library and put the list on GoodReads.com!!

Our first project in 2012 -
We organized HoneyLove’s Library and put the list on GoodReads.com!!

December 30th, 2011
British Beekeeping Association: “Criteria for apiary sites” - 
It  will rarely be possible to find a perfect location for an apiary, but  below are some factors to bear in mind when searching for a suitable  spot.Family, neighbors and the public: Unfortunately many  people are afraid of bees. While honey bees are usually not aggressive  whilst out foraging, sometimes the public confuses wasps with bees and  may come blaming you when they get stung. To try and make your bees less  visible, it’s good practice to enclose the apiary with a barrier of  some sort, such as a hedge or fence to force the bees to fly in above  head height… Keeping your hives less  visible also helps reduce the chance of vandalism or theft…
Forage: Try  to find out the amount and type of food sources available within your  potential site, by taking a walk about and/or by asking local  beekeepers… Bees  usually forage within a 2-3 mile radius of their hives. It takes four  pounds of nectar evaporated down to produce one pound of honey; it takes  about a dozen bees to gather enough nectar to make just one teaspoon of  honey, and each of those dozen bees needs to visit more than 2,600  flowers…
Environment:
A flat site is easier to place hives on!South facing is warmest.The site should be sheltered from wind…   It should be a site which does not flood Keep hives away from the bottom of dips in the land…Most  books advise that sites under trees are unsuitable…
The  bees will need a water source to produce brood food, dilute honey stores  and cool the hive in hot weather. If a suitable pond or stream is not  available consider providing a shallow water source in a sunny position,  with stones bees can rest on to avoid drowning. Place this away from  their main flight paths to avoid fouling. Adding a distinctive smell,  such as peppermint essence, will help the bees find the water.Access: Easy  access to a site throughout the year, with a hard path down to the  apiary, is important. Honey supers are heavy, so if you are using an out  apiary it helps if you can park your car nearby. Sites which require  climbing fences or ditches to enter are a bad idea…Space: You need room to stand  while inspecting and somewhere to put the roof and supers down….
[click here to read the full post on adventuresinbeeland.wordpress.com]

British Beekeeping Association: “Criteria for apiary sites” -

It will rarely be possible to find a perfect location for an apiary, but below are some factors to bear in mind when searching for a suitable spot.

Family, neighbors and the public: Unfortunately many people are afraid of bees. While honey bees are usually not aggressive whilst out foraging, sometimes the public confuses wasps with bees and may come blaming you when they get stung. To try and make your bees less visible, it’s good practice to enclose the apiary with a barrier of some sort, such as a hedge or fence to force the bees to fly in above head height… Keeping your hives less visible also helps reduce the chance of vandalism or theft…


Forage
: Try to find out the amount and type of food sources available within your potential site, by taking a walk about and/or by asking local beekeepers… Bees usually forage within a 2-3 mile radius of their hives. It takes four pounds of nectar evaporated down to produce one pound of honey; it takes about a dozen bees to gather enough nectar to make just one teaspoon of honey, and each of those dozen bees needs to visit more than 2,600 flowers…


Environment
:

A flat site is easier to place hives on!
South facing is warmest.
The site should be sheltered from wind…  
It should be a site which does not flood
Keep hives away from the bottom of dips in the land…
Most books advise that sites under trees are unsuitable…

The bees will need a water source to produce brood food, dilute honey stores and cool the hive in hot weather. If a suitable pond or stream is not available consider providing a shallow water source in a sunny position, with stones bees can rest on to avoid drowning. Place this away from their main flight paths to avoid fouling. Adding a distinctive smell, such as peppermint essence, will help the bees find the water.

Access: Easy access to a site throughout the year, with a hard path down to the apiary, is important. Honey supers are heavy, so if you are using an out apiary it helps if you can park your car nearby. Sites which require climbing fences or ditches to enter are a bad idea…

Space: You need room to stand while inspecting and somewhere to put the roof and supers down….

[click here to read the full post on adventuresinbeeland.wordpress.com]

December 1st, 2011
"Maybe if you just told us where you found the nectar”

"Maybe if you just told us where you found the nectar”

(via justcallmezim)

Honeylovin 

November 17th, 2011
DIY: Beeswax Ornaments by GardenMama

DIY: Beeswax Ornaments by GardenMama

November 16th, 2011
Small beekeepers could be the solution to Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD).
"We can thank the honeybee for four of every 10  bites of food we eat,  so for area beekeepers, their efforts aren’t just about the  honey.  Many beekeepers feel they are doing their part in helping the survival  of  what is likely our most important domestic species.
The Lou Marchi Total Recycling Institute at McHenry  County College (MCC) hosted a screening of the documentary Queen of the Sun:  What are the bees telling us? Oct. 25, followed by a panel discussion with  beekeepers from the Northern Illinois Beekeepers Association.
The critically-acclaimed film by Taggart Seigel  tells the story of  the mysterious disappearance of bees through stunning  photography,  humorous animations, and some very entertaining and  colorful  beekeepers.
The film looks at the 10,000-year history of  honeybees as a  domesticated species, from ancient times when honeybees were considered   sacred to today’s corporate agriculture practice of shipping honeybees   thousands of miles in flatbed trucks to pollinate almond groves in  California and blueberries in Maine.
In recent years, honeybees have been disappearing mysteriously;  America has lost millions of colonies. The sudden death of honeybee  colonies is called Colony Collapse Disorder. Beekeepers and  scientists  in the film point to chemical pesticides, single-crop farming or   monoculture, and the industrialization of beekeeping as reasons for CCD.
“Their crisis is our crisis. It’s colony collapse  disorder of the  human being too,” said Gunther Hauk, a biodynamic beekeeper who   operates Spikenard  Farm, a honeybee sanctuary in Virginia.
Experts in the film see bees as a barometer of the health of the world. Queen of The Sun refers to Austrian scientist Rudolf Steiner who predicted  the collapse  of honeybees in 1923.  “The mechanization of  beekeeping and  industrialization will eventually destroy beekeeping,” Steiner  predicted.
“We have to wake up early enough to make a change,”  said biochemist and beekeeper David Heaf, in the documentary.
The film considers reasons for the crisis and  presents solutions as well. Helping the honeybee survive can be as simple as growing bee-friendly  flowers, shunning pesticides,  and buying local, raw honey. Those really  interested in helping  honeybees should learn beekeeping.
“I really think that small time beekeepers are one  of the solutions  to the problem,” said Larry Krengel, a McHenry County  beekeeper and  panelist after the screening. Krengel is a member of the Northern   Illinois Beekeeper Association and teaches beekeeping at MCC and other  area  colleges…
Like chicken keeping, many suburbs don’t allow  beekeeping. However,  big cities like Chicago and Milwaukee do allow both backyard  chickens  and beehives. Chicago’s City Hall even has beehives on its rooftop garden…”
[click here to read the full article on grayslake.patch.com]

Small beekeepers could be the solution to Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD).

"We can thank the honeybee for four of every 10 bites of food we eat, so for area beekeepers, their efforts aren’t just about the honey. Many beekeepers feel they are doing their part in helping the survival of what is likely our most important domestic species.

The Lou Marchi Total Recycling Institute at McHenry County College (MCC) hosted a screening of the documentary Queen of the Sun: What are the bees telling us? Oct. 25, followed by a panel discussion with beekeepers from the Northern Illinois Beekeepers Association.

The critically-acclaimed film by Taggart Seigel tells the story of the mysterious disappearance of bees through stunning photography, humorous animations, and some very entertaining and colorful beekeepers.

The film looks at the 10,000-year history of honeybees as a domesticated species, from ancient times when honeybees were considered sacred to today’s corporate agriculture practice of shipping honeybees thousands of miles in flatbed trucks to pollinate almond groves in California and blueberries in Maine.

In recent years, honeybees have been disappearing mysteriously; America has lost millions of colonies. The sudden death of honeybee colonies is called Colony Collapse Disorder. Beekeepers and scientists in the film point to chemical pesticides, single-crop farming or monoculture, and the industrialization of beekeeping as reasons for CCD.

“Their crisis is our crisis. It’s colony collapse disorder of the human being too,” said Gunther Hauk, a biodynamic beekeeper who operates Spikenard Farm, a honeybee sanctuary in Virginia.

Experts in the film see bees as a barometer of the health of the world. Queen of The Sun refers to Austrian scientist Rudolf Steiner who predicted the collapse of honeybees in 1923.  “The mechanization of beekeeping and industrialization will eventually destroy beekeeping,” Steiner predicted.

“We have to wake up early enough to make a change,” said biochemist and beekeeper David Heaf, in the documentary.

The film considers reasons for the crisis and presents solutions as well. Helping the honeybee survive can be as simple as growing bee-friendly flowers, shunning pesticides, and buying local, raw honey. Those really interested in helping honeybees should learn beekeeping.

“I really think that small time beekeepers are one of the solutions to the problem,” said Larry Krengel, a McHenry County beekeeper and panelist after the screening. Krengel is a member of the Northern Illinois Beekeeper Association and teaches beekeeping at MCC and other area colleges…

Like chicken keeping, many suburbs don’t allow beekeeping. However, big cities like Chicago and Milwaukee do allow both backyard chickens and beehives. Chicago’s City Hall even has beehives on its rooftop garden…”

[click here to read the full article on grayslake.patch.com]