February 5th, 2012
ARTICLE: Helping beehives thrive
"It may be the month for lovers with Valentine’s Day just around the corner, but nature enthusiasts too have reasons to celebrate. Tomorrow, Maharashta Nature Park in Dharavi, will see a plethora of activities take place as city-based organization, Under The Mango Tree, is set to host, what could be, India’s first National Bee Day. The aim of the event is to create awareness about the Indian indigenous honeybee, Apis cerana indica, and its impact on the local environment. As part of the day’s agenda, a survey that shows the deep connection between bees and plants will also be unveiled.“Farmers tend to use European bees when they indulge in beekeeping and they are quite expensive. Through this event, we hope to create awareness about Indian bees and prove that they are a more sustainable option,” says Gurushabd Khalsa, Urban Beekeeping Project Coordinator, adding that a single bee box can have a substantial impact on a farm’s productivity… “Our beekeepers are now keeping boxes on residential building terraces too,” says Khalsa.What it means:Bees play an important and irreplaceable role in nature. Their value in agriculture as pollinators has been estimated to be 20 to 30 times more than their value as honey providers. The aforementioned survey was carried out among 15 plants and a small group of farmers in Dist Valsad over 2010-2011. It proved that farms that had bee boxes showed a considerable increase in productivity as compared to others. The productivity of items such as tomatoes (up to 160 per cent), cashew (up to 157 per cent), pigeon pea (up to 133 per cent), flat bean or papdi (up to 128 per cent) and chickpea (up to 79.5 per cent) increased”
[click here to view full article on hindustantimes.com]

ARTICLE: Helping beehives thrive

"It may be the month for lovers with Valentine’s Day just around the corner, but nature enthusiasts too have reasons to celebrate. Tomorrow, Maharashta Nature Park in Dharavi, will see a plethora of activities take place as city-based organization, Under The Mango Tree, is set to host, what could be, India’s first National Bee Day. The aim of the event is to create awareness about the Indian indigenous honeybee, Apis cerana indica, and its impact on the local environment. As part of the day’s agenda, a survey that shows the deep connection between bees and plants will also be unveiled.

“Farmers tend to use European bees when they indulge in beekeeping and they are quite expensive. Through this event, we hope to create awareness about Indian bees and prove that they are a more sustainable option,” says Gurushabd Khalsa, Urban Beekeeping Project Coordinator, adding that a single bee box can have a substantial impact on a farm’s productivity… “Our beekeepers are now keeping boxes on residential building terraces too,” says Khalsa.

What it means:
Bees play an important and irreplaceable role in nature. Their value in agriculture as pollinators has been estimated to be 20 to 30 times more than their value as honey providers. The aforementioned survey was carried out among 15 plants and a small group of farmers in Dist Valsad over 2010-2011. It proved that farms that had bee boxes showed a considerable increase in productivity as compared to others. The productivity of items such as tomatoes (up to 160 per cent), cashew (up to 157 per cent), pigeon pea (up to 133 per cent), flat bean or papdi (up to 128 per cent) and chickpea (up to 79.5 per cent) increased”

[click here to view full article on hindustantimes.com]

January 31st, 2012
URBAN BEEKEEPING -
"Urban beekeeping has been all the buzz, lately.  And for as many  people that keep bees, there are that many reasons WHY people keep bees.
One of the most important reasons to keep bees is for pollination.   Bee pollination is needed for the production of an estimated one-third  of the food crops grown in developed countries. When it comes to fruit,  the number of bees visiting a plant affects the size, uniformity and  amount of fruit it produces. Bee pollination also has an impact on other  foods we eat, such as meat, since the animals we consume often eat plants pollinated by bees.
It’s common knowledge that the honey bee produces honey, but did you  know that they also provide us with wax, pollen, royal jelly, propolis  and venom? These by-products have different uses but are all considered  beneficial to our health. “Apitherapy” means the use of honeybee  products for medicinal purposes.
Urban beekeeping is essential as the commercial beekeepers have  sustained huge losses all over the country year after year. As urban  beekeepers we can practices sans medications and chemicals. We can  provide diversity-rich habits as well as encourage those around us to  reduce and or eliminate the use of pesticides. Beekeeping is a very  civic hobby!  But beyond that, it’s a lot of fun, challenging and  rewarding.”
[click here to view the original post on botanicgardensblog.com]

URBAN BEEKEEPING -

"Urban beekeeping has been all the buzz, lately.  And for as many people that keep bees, there are that many reasons WHY people keep bees.

One of the most important reasons to keep bees is for pollination.  Bee pollination is needed for the production of an estimated one-third of the food crops grown in developed countries. When it comes to fruit, the number of bees visiting a plant affects the size, uniformity and amount of fruit it produces. Bee pollination also has an impact on other foods we eat, such as meat, since the animals we consume often eat plants pollinated by bees.

It’s common knowledge that the honey bee produces honey, but did you know that they also provide us with wax, pollen, royal jelly, propolis and venom? These by-products have different uses but are all considered beneficial to our health. “Apitherapy” means the use of honeybee products for medicinal purposes.

Urban beekeeping is essential as the commercial beekeepers have sustained huge losses all over the country year after year. As urban beekeepers we can practices sans medications and chemicals. We can provide diversity-rich habits as well as encourage those around us to reduce and or eliminate the use of pesticides. Beekeeping is a very civic hobby!  But beyond that, it’s a lot of fun, challenging and rewarding.”

[click here to view the original post on botanicgardensblog.com]

January 23rd, 2012

HoneyLove Sanctuary
- January 22, 2012

January 18th, 2012
"I’ve been searching for power-packed smoothie supplements to get me  through the winter doldrums, and bee pollen keeps making an appearance  in "superfood" lists. I finally picked up a small bottle from the honey  stand at my local farmer’s market. Curious about these golden granules?  Read on.
Bee pollen (not to be confused with airborne pollen, which  causes allergies and hay fever) is what results when honeybees pick up  flower pollen granules, mix them with regurgitated honey or nectar, and  pack them into “baskets” on their hind legs to take back to the hive.  Due to their impressive nutritional profile, bee pollen pellets have a  serious superfood reputation. A tablespoonful of bee pollen contains  about 45 calories and consists of 35% protein, 55% carbohydrate, 2%  fatty acids and 3% minerals and vitamins. Bee collected pollen also reportedly contains 8 flavonoids, at least 11 carotenoids, vitamins C, E, all the  Bs, all free amino acids, minerals, more than 100 enzymes and several  growth regulators.
Because of this, bee pollen is best consumed raw to preserve as many  nutrients as possible. The taste varies according to the type of flower  the pollen came from (obviously), but in general bee pollen tends to  have a slightly sweet, slightly floral taste…”
[click here to read the full post on thekitchn.com]

"I’ve been searching for power-packed smoothie supplements to get me through the winter doldrums, and bee pollen keeps making an appearance in "superfood" lists. I finally picked up a small bottle from the honey stand at my local farmer’s market. Curious about these golden granules? Read on.

Bee pollen (not to be confused with airborne pollen, which causes allergies and hay fever) is what results when honeybees pick up flower pollen granules, mix them with regurgitated honey or nectar, and pack them into “baskets” on their hind legs to take back to the hive. Due to their impressive nutritional profile, bee pollen pellets have a serious superfood reputation. A tablespoonful of bee pollen contains about 45 calories and consists of 35% protein, 55% carbohydrate, 2% fatty acids and 3% minerals and vitamins. Bee collected pollen also reportedly contains 8 flavonoids, at least 11 carotenoids, vitamins C, E, all the Bs, all free amino acids, minerals, more than 100 enzymes and several growth regulators.

Because of this, bee pollen is best consumed raw to preserve as many nutrients as possible. The taste varies according to the type of flower the pollen came from (obviously), but in general bee pollen tends to have a slightly sweet, slightly floral taste…”

[click here to read the full post on thekitchn.com]

January 12th, 2012
HoneyLove Cake!

HoneyLove Cake!

January 3rd, 2012
Photo: honey :: bears (by reny :: honey)

Photo: honey :: bears (by reny :: honey)

(Source: annaharo)

Photo: Honey Bee (by choimet)

Photo: Honey Bee (by choimet)

VIDEO: Guerrilla grafters: splicing fruit onto a city’s trees

The Guerrilla Grafters are a group of San Franciscans who believe urban trees are a precious thing to waste on simple flowers. Their goal is to graft- albeit illegally- fruit bearing branches onto non-fruit bearing fruit trees, in hopes that over time the cities ornamental trees can provide food for residents free of charge.